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tv   BBC World News America  PBS  January 9, 2015 3:59pm-4:31pm PST

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>> this is "bbc world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation newman's own foundation, giving all profits from newman's own to charity and pursuing the common good, kovler foundation, and mufg. >> they say the oldest trees bear the sweetest fruit. at mufg, we've believed in nurturing banking relationships for centuries, because strong financial partnerships are best cultivated for the years to
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come. giving your company the resources and stability to thrive, mufg. we build relationships that build the world. >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> reporting from washington, i am katty kay. two hostage crises in france come to a dramatic end. gunfire and explosions rang out in an industrial estate in france where two men wanted for an attack on a paris magazine had been holed up. they were brothers with links to extremist muslim groups. there are explosions at a kosher
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supermarket in paris after police stormed a second hostage situation. four hostages and one gunman were killed there. as the people of paris pause to remember the victims, the partner of the magazine editor killed on wednesday spoke to the bbc. >> we discussed the possibility he could be killed by terrorists. you know, we were very act of. -- active, very committed to life. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it has been a day of dramatic fast-moving events in france with two hostage situations unfolding at the same time. first, the two brothers
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suspected of killing 12 people at a magazine in paris were cornered outside the capital. both were killed in the police operation. meanwhile, in eastern paris, a gunman took several hostages inside a kosher supermarket. police action freed most of them, but four were killed and the gunman was shot dead by authorities. >> late afternoon in a small french town. bursts of gunfire marked the afternoon -- the end of a huge manhunt to find the brothers suspected of killing 12 people at a satirical newspaper. special forces appeared on the roof of the printing works where the gunmen had been hiding. there was shooting and explosions. after a few minutes, silence and the two most wanted men in
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france were dead, and a hostage freed. the day had begun with convoys of police vehicles scouring a busy highway 40 miles from paris , for the brothers wanted for a terrorist attack at the paper "charlie hebdo." the gunmen had stolen a car, and the police chased them to a town of 8000 people. helicopters hovered over a printing works where the gunmen had forced their way into taking off hostage. -- force their way in, taking a hostage. a salesman thought at first they were police. >> he told me they did not kill civilians. they were heavily armed like special forces members. they had kalashnikovs. i was outside the door of the office. one of the terrorists told me he was from the police and ordered me to leave, since they did not kill civilians, so i left.
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>> town residents were ordered to stay indoors. it is a small french town where only a few thousand people -- many of them have been told to stay behind their shutters. outside on the streets, line after line of police trucks. >> the only thing we want, this resident told me, is to have a telephone call about our children and how they are. police officers in body armor began evacuating children from schools. small groups being led out from their classrooms and put on buses. anxious faces, unaware of the dangers around them. after several hours, the police were able to establish contact with the two gunmen who were in a building in this industrial estate. a told police they were prepared to die as martyrs. but the police operation became much more complicated when it was understood that the two hostage incidents in paris were
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linked. the sets of gunman appeared to know each other, with hostages being seized to barter for the release of the brothers. the police decided to coordinate their assault. before that happened the gunmen burst out of the printing works firing. within minutes, they were dead, and a man in the building was free. some reports say he had been secretly passing information to the police during the day. >> today he showed the professionalism and courage of our troops. i want to say how grateful all the french people are that this has been resolved. >> helicopters quickly landed where the gunmen had been shot. one government minister said it was the only possible outcome. the president said, we have taken on a war against terrorism. >> just minutes after those events, there was another dramatic assault in eastern
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paris, when security forces stormed a jewish supermarket. a gunman there had taken several hostages and threatened to kill them if security forces moved in. police said the gunman himself was killed in an operation, but a woman who was thought to be helping him seems to have escaped. it is still a confused situation. several people were freed when the police moved in. four hostages had already died. our paris correspondent had the story. waxing message from france's newest enemies -- we can strike anywhere. and nothing says it better than anti-terror squads stocking -- stalking gunmen within sight of the eiffel tower. the target was a jewish neighborhood. at lunchtime, a man armed with machine guns walked into this kosher supermarket and took more than a dozen people hostage. some of them managed to call
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their families. >> i said, don't call. it is too dangerous. i think she is in the basement or a cold storage room. i am not sure. >> too many parents had to imagine the grief. huddled in a nearby playground teachers and pupils, as the order came to close all local schools. this is the second time today that france has faced a hostage situation in or around the capital. whether or not they are linked the ambition is clear. it is likely to change the way this country views its security, its safety, and its society. officers named two suspects also blamed with killing a police officer yesterday. they are believed to have other links to the hostage takers. she is reported to be on the run. with darkness came the police
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assaults. local media caught the moment when the commandos stormed in. they had found the hostage taker praying, they said. a few minutes later, the first glimpse of survivors. some too small to run for freedom already know how precious it can feel. four hostages died in this attack, along with their captor. resident whole law and threat was not over yet. >> i call for all men and women of france to stand up for the values of democracy, freedom, and pluralism, which are very dear to all of us, and which europe embodies. >> there is relief tonight at the end of this extraordinary chapter. that anxiety over how it could happen at all, and what tomorrow
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could bring. >> lucy williamson reporting for us there. hugh edwards is in paris. he joins us now. the public prosecutor has been speaking in paris. what more have we learned about the relationship between the taking of the supermarket and what happens -- happened in the small town? >> there are lots of new elements. the public prosecutor is -- bear with me while i take you through some elements. he confirms explosives were found at both sites. that is at the supermarket and northeast of paris. and firming too that the girlfriend, the 26-year-old woman, is still on the run. the search is still ongoing. i have not found her. also telling us that because of the big overlap between these
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investigations, the investigations will be combined into one bigger investigation. they do shed on what is going on. this morning at the print works we were telling you about earlier -- we are told that these brothers took the company manager hostage. that was around 9:00 this morning. that manager was freed at around 10:30 this morning. we have been referring to the second employee as a hostage all day. in effect, that is what the person was. but in fact he was hiding in the second-floor cafeteria without the brothers realizing it. he may well have been supplying vital information to the police. a little more from the prosecutor's office, saying these brothers emerged from the company building.
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they emerged as if they were in confrontation mode. that is when the police shot them dead. one police officer was injured during an operation. that is when the employee on the second floor -- that is when the employee was freed, and freed unharmed. four hostages lost their lives. a final point if i may. this is interesting. this has been referred to once or twice today. the man who has the supermarket that had all the hostages there -- he is suspected of killing a police -- a policewoman yesterday morning. they found his dna on a cloth identified him within two hours. they knew exactly who he was. that is why today when he took the hostages in the kosher
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supermarket, his third message to police was, you know who i am. there was mutual understanding going on. that is why there will be lots of questions about the level of cooperation between various agencies not just within france, but with other western european countries and the united states. >> hugh edwards, thanks very much. >> more details emerging about the men who have been blamed for wednesday's attacks. the supermarket gunmen, their motives became clearer when there was a call to a french television channel. he claimed he was backed and financed by al qaeda in yemen. in a second call, there was a claim they were acting for the islamic state and the terrorist attacks of been coordinated.
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we take a look at all of that. >> young, popular, peaceful. this is cherif in his days as a would-be rapper. how did he go from this to this a prime suspect in the murder of 12 people in paris on wednesday? [speaking french] >> cherif lived in this paris suburb, an orphan of algerian parents. he fell under the influence of a radical young preacher. farid allegedly showed him and others images from a prison in iraq where u.s. soldiers had abused some prisoners.
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the parachuting can be traced back to 2008, when cherif was convicted for trying to recruit jihadist to go to iraq. he met this man, convicted of terrorism and linked to al qaeda. he attended finsbury park mosque in london while it was controlled by the radical preacher abu hamsa. the other spent a year in yemen with extremists before returning to france. both brothers were on u.s. and uk's no-fly watchlist. officials revealed that saiid sneaks through illegally through a port on the coast, and then joined up with al qaeda. >> a number of europeans have traveled to yemen to link up with al qaeda in the yemen peninsula, an affiliate of osama bin laden's ideology. they have trained europeans to take art in terrorism before,
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but not in europe itself. this may be the first example in france. >> there is the third gunmen who took hostages today in a jewish supermarket in paris after earlier killing a policewoman. he claimed to be linked to the islamic state. >>[speaking french] >> and yet the questions remain. was al qaeda in yemen really behind this? or was it the islamic state? or just individuals? above all, why, when all the suspects were known to police, were these outrages not prevented? >> i speak with the senior director for defense policy on the national security council. under president bush and under president obama. he is now on the council.
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these men were known to the police. and yet this still happened. it is incredibly hard for intelligence and security services to stop these kinds of attacks. >> it is a question of capacity on one hand. there are thousands of foreign fighters coming in and out of syria and iraq. it is also a question of our values and our society. if you want to live in a democratic state that is not a police state, you have to have a structure or a means of surveillance, and the rules and the laws that allow us to continue to cherish our freedom but also gives us the appropriate level of security. in france, my guess is they will turn the dial more to security in the aftermath. >> one of the brothers had been under surveillance since coming back from yemen. there were suspicions. they spent time in prison. how much more of a trigger do
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security forces need? how long do they keep up surveillance? >> it is case by case. we will learn over time about the siege today and the gradual resolution. we will learn more and those details will come out. oakley, we will learn lessons and thereby strengthen the way we go about law enforcement and intelligence. >> you have spoken about the need to deal with the root causes of why there are so many young men who are young muslims who feel so alienated they go and join jihad in the first place. that is also a very difficult thing to do, isn't it? >> it is a generational challenge, and it may not even be achievable. this region where all of these terrorist attacks are coming out of, where there is all this extremism, the society suffer from a lot of alienation. among much of the youth population in particular, they do not have a sense of the midi,
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a freedom to choose their professions, the freedom of expression. these are the issues in the societies that are giving root and generating these types of threats. syria right now is one of the hottest races, and we know why such extremism is coming out of it. it is getting more berlin each time it emerges. isis is more relevant than al qaeda was in two thousand one. if we do not deal with root causes over time, it is going to keep getting worse. we are going to keep facing unfortunate weeks like we have seen. i say means looking across prisons, schools, and society. >> i am not suggesting outside power should dictate the specifics of how middle eastern countries should structure their societies. but this will have to be a partnership over time if we are going to make any progress and partners, dealing with this really strong generational major
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problem. >> the attack in paris has focused attention once again. you are watching "bbc world news america." "charlie hebdo"'s editor was among those killed. he hear from his widow about why she thinks this is a war. sri lanka has worn in a new president at a ceremony in the capital. thousands of people gathered in the open air to watch the handover of power, just a day after the former president, who had been in office almost a decade. the president has promised to tackle corruption and institutional reform. u.s. secretary of state john kerry was among the first to congratulate him. this report does contain some flash photography. >> less than two months ago
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calling the elections, the outcome we are seeing today would seem unimaginable. everyone thought perhaps it could be a smooth road to victory. overnight, the health minister in his own government switched over to the other side, got a lot of support from opposition parties, and has today been victorious. he campaigned on institutional reform. he said that what he is going to do if he becomes president is to limit the unlimited powers of the president. he said the president had become above the law. he was going to make sri lanka more of a democracy than it is right now. the people decided they would like to bet on something new. they both had talked about issues like corruption, price rises, and democracy, which were bothering them. he has been supported by a
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variety of political parties. his big challenge is to hold his own and to deliver on those promises. his manifesto actually looked like a calendar. it is when he is going to deliver on his agenda of changing the constitution and making this a democratic place. he is going to have a lot to live up to now. >> the city of paris honored the victims of wednesday's attack, which left 12 people dead. among those at the ceremony was the widow of the editor of "charlie hebdo," killed in the attack. she said he was a fighter for freedom. she described him as a beautiful man. she sat down with our special correspondent. >> banners declaring solidarity and defiance.
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paris is charlie. we are charlie. grieving friends and relatives were in city hall. the murdered editor -- an hour before he was attacked, he sent his wife a text saying, i love you. after the attack, she desperately tried to reach her husband's body. >> we went to "charlie hebdo." in the street, when i arrived i did not know if my husband was alive or was not alive. i could not believe it was possible, because he is too young. he's too young, only 47 years old. >> when she arrived, she begged police to be able to see his
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body. >> my husband, i would like to sleep with him. i know they have to do their work, but i did not want to let the body of my husband -- >> in his last cartoon he had depicted a fundamentalist warning of attacks in paris. his widow now wants the state to confront radical islam. >> you have to tell the truth to people. it is a war. he was killed by terrorists. >> at the grand mosque in paris, there was strong security and sympathy for the victims of extremist violence.
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we are disgusted by what is happening, this young man said. they are not an example for muslims. they are madmen. at city hall today, a promise to protect the democratic values of the republic, also from the widow of a murdered editor. will you campaign for freedom of speech? >> and stay in france and fight for freedom. but i know i could be killed by terrorists. i am very, i think -- i just want to cry. >> bbc news, paris. >> speaking about her husband, who was killed on wednesdays attack, the editor of "charlie hebdo." remember, you can find out much
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more about all that has happened in paris on our website. from all of us here at "world news america," thanks for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation newman's own foundation giving all profits from newman's own to charity and pursuing the common good, kovler foundation, and mufg. >> it is a global truth. we can do more when we work together. at mufg, our banking relationship spans cultures and supports almost every industry
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across the globe, because success takes partnership, and only through discipline and trust can we create something greater than ourselves. mufg. we build relationships that build the world. >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
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coming up next on odd squad... dr. o: when that plant sprays someone some seriously weird things start happening to them. we'll need to fill this one-gallon container with four different ingredients. we'll need one gallon or ms. o will stay weird forever. what brings you to this place? - odd squad is made possible in part by... - ...a cooperative agreement with the u.s. department of education, the corporation for public broadcasting's ready to learn grant and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. my name is agent olive. this is my partner, agent otto. this is my third-favourite pillow case... but back to otto and me. we work for an organization run by kids that investigates anything strange, weird and especially odd. our job is to put things right again. [♪]
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[♪] who do we work for? we work for odd squad. thanks for coming odd squad. what seems to be the problem, ma'am? i finally found a pair of running shoes that i like, but i can't wear them because... i have two left feet. agents: whoa. how do you run? mainly in circles. not to worry. we have a fix. now they're both lefties. not where i thought you were gonna go, but... i'll take 'em! thanks, odd squad! happy to help. have a good day. excuse us, sir...
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woo! yeah! if sheila could see me now! there you two are! let me guess - something very odd has happened. um... why would you even say that? i got a new plant, and i've been thinking of names. this is mr. greenjeans. isn't that right mr. greenjeans? [coughing] is it okay to breathe that stuff? how should i know? i'm not a doctor! did someone call for a doctor? whoa! dr. o, this plant just puffed some sort of mist on me. anything i should be worried about? not at all, but why don't i check this plant out, just in case? see ya, dr. o. bye. thanks, doctor. bye! um... now that my plant is gone, this is kind of

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